Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Look what we found...

... under one of the hideous brick fireplaces...





Now hopefully, under the hearth there will be more of these tiles hidden. I just hope we can get to them...

BTW that other fireplace I couldn't get uploaded? This is it. It's a bit dusty here and the string was put from when the grate was first closed off (it's now weighted down so is okay and the string has gone).

8 comments:

Catharine Soulipsis said...

Those tiles are flipping gorgeous Lisa!

What a find!

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

Why thank you Catherine...

JoeinVegas said...

Home makeover! Time to call out the studio cameras and make a show!

Rob said...

It's surprising how often old fireplaces have really nice tiles that have just been covered up. And it's always nice to have origional stuff. Our front porch has original geometric tiling (from 1887 I think - I'd need to check the exact year). Not int he same league as your tiles but still nice to have.

Gert said...

Now you've got me worrying about my house. 1830s. I rather like the non-fireplace but now I'm wondering what lies below

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

Gert:

"Tiles were first used in Georgian Fireplaces when the whole fireplace opening would be tiled and a fire basket place inside it on the tiled hearth.

Fire baskets were superceded by Hob Grates and then Framed Hob Grates and eventually by Cast Iron Fireplace Inserts. From c1800-1860 plain cast iron square framed and arched fireplaces were common

Victorian tiles were used widely from flooring to wall covering to and eventually as fireplace decoration.

Tile sliders were introduced into cast iron fireplaces at side of the opening from 1860-1880. They allowed 6" tiles to be slid down at either side of the opening.
There is no practical reason for the tiles, they are purely decorative."


Given you date your house the the 1830s it may be as much in a Georgian as 'Victorian' style. What tiles you may have beneath any more recent work may depend on the period of the house as well as what else has been done to it since...

chrissie said...

Those tiles are superb Rullsenberg!
I know what a difference the discovery of "Victorian style" tiles beneath our hearth (in 2003)has made to our living room here at our 1860 terraced house. They had to be cleaned up in the proper manner,which was quite an intricate process, but it was worth every minute of graft!! :)I look forward to seeing yours in all their splendour. Hugs.

Lisa Rullsenberg said...

Hard graft... I know exactly what you mean!!!